Are you an Entrepreneur, a Manager, or a Technician? - The E-Myth Revisited Michael Gerber Section 1

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Are you an Entrepreneur, a Manager, or a Technician?

 

Part 1

The main Idea and the key principles of the first section of the book is as follows.

1. Most new businesses are started by technicians -- people who are skilled at what they enjoy doing, and who figure they’d rather work for themselves than for someone else.

2. Almost all new business owners assume that because they understand the technical work of the business, they understand how a technical business works. In reality, these are two completely different issues, and blurring the distinction between the two is a fatal error.

3. Building a business  takes three unique skill sets:

1. The Entrepreneur –- Ideal for scaling-up  the business

  • Visionary, dreamer, innovator
  • Lives in the future
  • Craves control & change  

2. The Manager -- supplies order and systems- Ideal for sustaining busines s

  • Pragmatist, planner, organizer
  • Lives in the past
  • Craves order and structure

3. The Technician-- supplies the output-Ideal for execution

  • Lives in the present
  • Likes to immerse in work
  • Disinterested in grand visions & systems

 

The Entrepreneur can drive the business, the Manager can ensure it’s sustainable, and the Technician can stay in touch with the nuts and bolts of the work being done.

 

Part 2

For businesses to grow and evolve, the business owner must be willing to change to meet the business needs. Gerber explains the 3 growth stages of businesses – Infancy, Adolescence, and Maturity – and why businesses fail due to the owner's’ inability to perform the roles required of him.

  1. Infancy -- when the technician is to the fore. The Technician starts the business and works extremely hard. Before long the business owns the technician as opposed to the other way around.